Morning AMp (Weekdays 8-10AM CST)

The Vocalo Morning Amp is a call-in talk show hosted by Brian Babylon and Molly Adams. Want some funny, smart, and engaging talk? Tune in Monday through Friday in Chi-town & NWI. Listen on 89.5 FM (NWI/CHI), 90.7 FM (CHI) or WLUW 88.7 (CHI). Across the globe at Vocalo.org

Subscribe to our Podcast.

Recent Tweets @themorningamp
Posts tagged "history"
10 plays

htdeverything:

Hal Needham, our favorite stuntman, died Friday at 82. He did stunts in more than 300 films, directed “Smokey and the Bandit” and “The Cannonball Run,” won an Honorary Oscar last year, got a lot of speeding tickets, and broke a lot of bones. He was a regular guest on our show, and here we listen back to a few of our favorite moments with him. 

Cool dude? Or coolest dude? RIP Hal Needham.

chicagopubliclibrary:

Five Things You Don’t Know About The Great Chicago Fire

On the 142nd anniversary of The Great Chicago Fire, we thought we would share five interesting pieces of trivia that you might not know about the blaze that crippled our city.

  1. Today, the Chicago Fire Department training academy is located on the site of the O’Leary property where the Great Chicago Fire started.
  2. On October 7th, 1871 the night before, a fire tore through four city blocks before the fire department could bring it to bear.
  3. $200 million dollars worth of property was destroyed, the equivalent of $3,778,169,634 today.
  4. Companies of soldiers were summoned to Chicago and martial law was declared on October 11, ending three days of chaos. Martial law was lifted several weeks later.
  5. In 1997, the Chicago City Council passed a resolution exonerating Catherine O’Leary for starting the Great Chicago Fire.

"For me, it still stands as one of my most meaningful pictures," he wrote in his post. "It makes me wonder… At what point do we begin to mistrust one another? When do we begin to judge one another based on gender or race? I have always wondered what happened to these children. I wonder if they are still friends."

(via The 40-Year-Old Photo That Gives Us A Reason To Smile : Code Switch : NPR)

toasterwaffles:

Look what the original La Pasadita used to sell. 5¢!

fieldmuseumphotoarchives:

CSGN44668

© The Field Museum, CSGN44668, Photographer Charles Carpenter.

Field Museum of Natural History building as seen from the roof of the Blackstone Hotel, looking south west. Smoke from passing train in foreground.

8x10 negative

5/1/1921

obitoftheday:

Tune in tomorrow to The Morning AMp to find out. I will be on at 8:10 a.m. CST.

You have a plethora of listening options:

If you miss it I’ll post a link.

John O’Connor and I had decided to get married and he was a year behind me and so I was out of law school and we both liked to eat, so that meant one of us was going to have to work and that was me. I needed a job and I wanted to work as a lawyer. I had graduated high in my class and I thought I could probably get a job. We had notices on our placement bulletin board at Stanford Law School that said, ‘Stanford law graduates: Call us if you want to get an interview for employment. We’d be happy to talk to you.’ I called at least 40 of those firms asking for an interview and not one of them would give me an interview. I was a woman and they said, ‘We don’t hire women,’ and that was a shock to me. It was a total shock. It shouldn’t have been. I should have known better. I should have followed what was going on, but I hadn’t and it just came as a real shock because I had done well in law school and it never entered my mind that I couldn’t even get an interview.

Good God, we hope MHP’s historical knowledge bomb might actually shut down some of this “Harlem shaking,” but we know it won’t.

obitoftheday:

Obit of the Day: On the Radio!

In OOTD’s continuing goal of become the bestest obituary site in the universe, I am heading to the radio. Tomorrow (March 1) at 8:15 a.m. Chicago time I will be talking about some dead folks with the Morning Amp on Vocalo (both of which have tumblrs).

You can find the station in various ways:

  • If you are in the Chicagoland area try 90.7 or 89.5 FM
  • You can listen to the live stream at www.vocalo.org
  • There is a vocalo app and I usually listen on tuneinradio, which also has an app. 

So tune in. (And if you can’t I’ll post the audio tomorrow afternoon, ‘cause we live in the future and time doesn’t matter.)

obitoftheday:

Obit of the Day: “Growing Up Black in Nazi Germany”
Hans Massaquoi was very disappointed when his teacher told him that he could not join the Hitler Youth. Massaquoi’s friends had all joined and he was enthralled with the uniforms, the parades, the camp-outs. But Hans’ desire to join was trumped by the color of his skin.
Born in 1926, Mr. Massaquoi’s parents were a German nurse and the son of a Liberian diplomat. He would grow up in Hamburg as the Weimar Republic was collapsing and the the Third Reich was building up.
When he was in second grade, Mr. Massaquoi was so taken with the Nazi imagery that, at his request, his nanny sewed a swastika to his sweater. Although his mother removed it when he returned home from school, a picture had already been taken. (See above.)
Mr. Massaquoi’s family lived in Germany for the duration of the war. According to Mr. Massaquoi’s memoir, Destined to Witness, he theorized that there were so few blacks living in Germany that they were a low priority for extermination. Eventually he would move: first to his father’s home country of Liberia and later to Chicago.
In the United States, although trained in aviation mechanics, Mr. Massaquoi would become a writer for Jet magazine and eventual move to its sister publication, Ebony, where he became managing editor.
Mr. Massaquoi, who passed away on January 19, 2013 on his 87th birthday, was encouraged to write down the story of his unusual childhood by his friend and author of Roots, Alex Haley.
Sources: L.A. Times and Chicago Sun-Times
(Image is from Mr. Massaqoui’s collection and copyright of William Morrow Paperbacks via spiritosanto.wordpress.com)

obitoftheday:

Obit of the Day: “Growing Up Black in Nazi Germany”

Hans Massaquoi was very disappointed when his teacher told him that he could not join the Hitler Youth. Massaquoi’s friends had all joined and he was enthralled with the uniforms, the parades, the camp-outs. But Hans’ desire to join was trumped by the color of his skin.

Born in 1926, Mr. Massaquoi’s parents were a German nurse and the son of a Liberian diplomat. He would grow up in Hamburg as the Weimar Republic was collapsing and the the Third Reich was building up.

When he was in second grade, Mr. Massaquoi was so taken with the Nazi imagery that, at his request, his nanny sewed a swastika to his sweater. Although his mother removed it when he returned home from school, a picture had already been taken. (See above.)

Mr. Massaquoi’s family lived in Germany for the duration of the war. According to Mr. Massaquoi’s memoir, Destined to Witness, he theorized that there were so few blacks living in Germany that they were a low priority for extermination. Eventually he would move: first to his father’s home country of Liberia and later to Chicago.

In the United States, although trained in aviation mechanics, Mr. Massaquoi would become a writer for Jet magazine and eventual move to its sister publication, Ebony, where he became managing editor.

Mr. Massaquoi, who passed away on January 19, 2013 on his 87th birthday, was encouraged to write down the story of his unusual childhood by his friend and author of Roots, Alex Haley.

Sources: L.A. Times and Chicago Sun-Times

(Image is from Mr. Massaqoui’s collection and copyright of William Morrow Paperbacks via spiritosanto.wordpress.com)