Morning AMp (Weekdays 8-10AM CST)

The Vocalo Morning Amp is a call-in talk show hosted by Brian Babylon and Molly Adams. Want some funny, smart, and engaging talk? Tune in Monday through Friday in Chi-town & NWI. Listen on 89.5 FM (NWI/CHI), 90.7 FM (CHI) or WLUW 88.7 (CHI). Across the globe at Vocalo.org

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Posts tagged "chicago"

Nude calendar banned on facebook. Curtis Shaw Flagg talks news stories through the lens of social media. The Warwick University Women’s Rowing Club is set to release their next Nude Calendar; facebook banned images from their calendar but did not ban images from the men’s calendar. Also, companies are saving tons of money by job reciting through social media.

Comedian Rory Scovel is recognized as one of the most dynamic comedians today. He has performed on Conan, Late Night, and the Late Late Show. He was in town for 4 shows at Up Comedy Club this weekend. His latest Album “Dilation” is available on iTunes. More information on this weekends shows at: http://upcomedyclub.com/show.cfm?id=343371&cart

Warren Phynix Johnson is an old friend of Vocalo and has a new improv show called “The Bastards Of The Underground” feat. Jamprov at the iO theatre. More information at http://ioimprov.com/chicago/io/shows/the-bastards-of-the-underground-feat-jamprov

Dr. Coya Paz joins the Morning AMp for Peace Prize Thursday. They discuss voter sentiment for Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel in light of the exit of his most high profile challenger Chicago Teachers Union Presisdent Karen Lewis. Brian Babylon is in stuido, Adrienne Brandyburg co-hosts.

Curtis Shaw Flagg joins the AMp to talk about the news through a social media lens. Today they discuss Facebooks apology to lgbTQ performers for making them change their stage names, social media censorship amid protests in Hong Kong, and the teacher who quit her job to make money making online videos.

This weekend, October 18 and 19, the Chicago Architecture Foundation activates Open House Chicago, where people are invited into usually off-limits buildings and private homes throughout the city’s neighborhoods. Garrett Karp, program manager of OHC, joined Molly Adams and Luis Antonio Perez to share some highlights, especially for those who think buildings are boring.

teamvocalo:

Loyce set the bar for #teamvocalo today when he stopped by to write a personal check. But giving to us is easier than that: Go to Vocalo.org/donate right now, it just takes 3 mins to support independent, commercial-free media for everyone.

(via toasterwaffles)

britticisms:

The bravery of the young women who have spoken up about their experiences with rape and sexual assault in the alt-lit community can’t be reiterated enough. Institutions - big or small - nurture environments where it can feel impossible to give voice to traumatic experiences. This especially holds true for those routinely with the least amount of power: young women. Speaking out against communities that support their own ideas of order and “normal” is difficult … sometimes impossible for many women.
The situation reminded me of my own experiences. As a black woman who was assaulted in one of the poorest and most violent neighborhoods in the city, I knew things would not go my way. And, as things tend to fall, they haven’t. The man who assaulted me is still on the loose even though I’ve identified him, even though the police told me he’s been active for years.
My assault this summer was not the first time I was assaulted, but it was the first time I felt open enough to talk about it. I spent years in therapy dealing with the mental results of past incidents. In my mind, I believed terrible things were meant to happen to me, that it was fate, that it was always out of my control and that I should ultimately succumb to the violent, damaging, misogynistic culture in which we all live. But CLEARLY that is fucked up and dangerous and it left me beaten down in a way that I never understood.
It manifested in weird ways - in work, in romance, in friendship. I maintained terrible friendships because deep down I didn’t believe I was worthy of good friendships. Deep down I knew friends would disappoint me because I believed relationships of any kind were built on disappointments. My parents were the one exception to the rule. I succumbed to the mental terror of my old work environment and was treated to racist and sexist confrontations as if they were normal.
But this time was different. And even though this year saw personal and physical traumas, I felt stronger mentally. I recognized what could have happened to my mind, mostly, if I stayed quiet, and didn’t. Not everyone is capable of doing so and I don’t bemoan anyone that can’t. How many friends have come to me to discuss their rapes and assaults? And how many friends have only shared those experiences with me, have kept it buried deep inside because it is the only thing that makes sense to them?
Sometimes, your voice is all you have. I did everything I thought I was supposed to do and relied on the police, only to watch nothing happen. Systems of great power are designed to stay systems of great power. Exclusions are the norm. If your truth is all you have, then give voice to it.

britticisms:

The bravery of the young women who have spoken up about their experiences with rape and sexual assault in the alt-lit community can’t be reiterated enough. Institutions - big or small - nurture environments where it can feel impossible to give voice to traumatic experiences. This especially holds true for those routinely with the least amount of power: young women. Speaking out against communities that support their own ideas of order and “normal” is difficult … sometimes impossible for many women.

The situation reminded me of my own experiences. As a black woman who was assaulted in one of the poorest and most violent neighborhoods in the city, I knew things would not go my way. And, as things tend to fall, they haven’t. The man who assaulted me is still on the loose even though I’ve identified him, even though the police told me he’s been active for years.

My assault this summer was not the first time I was assaulted, but it was the first time I felt open enough to talk about it. I spent years in therapy dealing with the mental results of past incidents. In my mind, I believed terrible things were meant to happen to me, that it was fate, that it was always out of my control and that I should ultimately succumb to the violent, damaging, misogynistic culture in which we all live. But CLEARLY that is fucked up and dangerous and it left me beaten down in a way that I never understood.

It manifested in weird ways - in work, in romance, in friendship. I maintained terrible friendships because deep down I didn’t believe I was worthy of good friendships. Deep down I knew friends would disappoint me because I believed relationships of any kind were built on disappointments. My parents were the one exception to the rule. I succumbed to the mental terror of my old work environment and was treated to racist and sexist confrontations as if they were normal.

But this time was different. And even though this year saw personal and physical traumas, I felt stronger mentally. I recognized what could have happened to my mind, mostly, if I stayed quiet, and didn’t. Not everyone is capable of doing so and I don’t bemoan anyone that can’t. How many friends have come to me to discuss their rapes and assaults? And how many friends have only shared those experiences with me, have kept it buried deep inside because it is the only thing that makes sense to them?

Sometimes, your voice is all you have. I did everything I thought I was supposed to do and relied on the police, only to watch nothing happen. Systems of great power are designed to stay systems of great power. Exclusions are the norm. If your truth is all you have, then give voice to it.

Last year Linda Tirado was just a regular old Internet person when she left a long comment on Gawker explaining why poor people make seemingly nonsensical decisions. Now she is the author of a book, Hand to Mouth, which expands her observations to cover more aspects of her life. We talked with Tirado about her life and a market that demands explanations from poor people.

Sports Agent Molly Fletcher joins the Morning AMp to share tips from her new book “A Winner’s Guide to Negotiating”